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St Lawrence
Catholic Church, Edenbridge
St Lawrence Edenbridge
Telephone: 01732 862256
Email: info@stlawrence.org.uk

Following in His steps

The thoughts of Father Benedict as we follow in Christ's footsteps

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  • POPE'S MESSAGE MESSAGE ON THE WORLD DAY FOR THE POOR 2021

    23rd January 2021

    MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
    FOR THE XXIX WORLD DAY OF THE SICK 2021


    "You have but one teacher and you are all brothers" (Mt 23:8). A trust-based relationship to guide care for the sick

    Dear brothers and sisters,

    The celebration of the XXIX World Day of the Sick on 11 February 2021, the liturgical memorial of the Blessed Virgin Mary of Lourdes, is an opportunity to devote special attention to the sick and to those who provide them with assistance and care both in healthcare institutions and within families and communities. We think in particular of those who have suffered, and continue to suffer, the effects of the worldwide coronavirus pandemic. To all, and especially to the poor and the marginalized, I express my spiritual closeness and assure them of the Church's loving concern.

    1. The theme of this Day is drawn from the Gospel passage in which Jesus criticizes the hypocrisy of those who fail to practise what they preach (cf. Mt 23:1-12). When our faith is reduced to empty words, unconcerned with the lives and needs of others, the creed we profess proves inconsistent with the life we lead. The danger is real. That is why Jesus uses strong language about the peril of falling into self-idolatry. He tells us: "You have but one teacher and you are all brothers"(v. 8).

    Jesus' criticism of those who "preach but do not practise" (v. 3) is helpful always and everywhere, since none of us is immune to the grave evil of hypocrisy, which prevents us from flourishing as children of the one Father, called to live universal fraternity.

    Before the needs of our brothers and sisters, Jesus asks us to respond in a way completely contrary to such hypocrisy. He asks us to stop and listen, to establish a direct and personal relationship with others, to feel empathy and compassion, and to let their suffering become our own as we seek to serve them (cf. Lk 10:30-35).

    2. The experience of sickness makes us realize our own vulnerability and our innate need of others. It makes us feel all the more clearly that we are creatures dependent on God. When we are ill, fear and even bewilderment can grip our minds and hearts; we find ourselves powerless, since our health does not depend on our abilities or life's incessant worries (cf. Mt 6:27).

    Sickness raises the question of life's meaning, which we bring before God in faith. In seeking a new and deeper direction in our lives, we may not find an immediate answer. Nor are our relatives and friends always able to help us in this demanding quest.

    The biblical figure of Job is emblematic in this regard. Job's wife and friends do not accompany him in his misfortune; instead, they blame him and only aggravate his solitude and distress. Job feels forlorn and misunderstood. Yet for all his extreme frailty, he rejects hypocrisy and chooses the path of honesty towards God and others. He cries out to God so insistently that God finally answers him and allows him to glimpse a new horizon. He confirms that Job's suffering is not a punishment or a state of separation from God, much less as sign of God's indifference. Job's heart, wounded and healed, then makes this vibrant and touching confession to the Lord: "I had heard of you by word of mouth, but now my eye has seen you" (42:5).

    3. Sickness always has more than one face: it has the face of all the sick, but also those who feel ignored, excluded and prey to social injustices that deny their fundamental rights (cf. Fratelli Tutti, 22). The current pandemic has exacerbated inequalities in our healthcare systems and exposed inefficiencies in the care of the sick. Elderly, weak and vulnerable people are not always granted access to care, or in an equitable manner. This is the result of political decisions, resource management and greater or lesser commitment on the part of those holding positions of responsibility. Investing resources in the care and assistance of the sick is a priority linked to the fundamental principle that health is a primary common good. Yet the pandemic has also highlighted the dedication and generosity of healthcare personnel, volunteers, support staff, priests, men and women religious, all of whom have helped, treated, comforted and served so many of the sick and their families with professionalism, self-giving, responsibility and love of neighbour. A silent multitude of men and women, they chose not to look the other way but to share the suffering of patients, whom they saw as neighbours and members of our one human family.

    Such closeness is a precious balm that provides support and consolation to the sick in their suffering. As Christians, we experience that closeness as a sign of the love of Jesus Christ, the Good Samaritan, who draws near with compassion to every man and woman wounded by sin. United to Christ by the working of the Holy Spirit, we are called to be merciful like the Father and to love in particular our frail, infirm and suffering brothers and sisters (cf. Jn 13:34-35). We experience this closeness not only as individuals but also as a community. Indeed, fraternal love in Christ generates a community of healing, a community that leaves no one behind, a community that is inclusive and welcoming, especially to those most in need.

    Here I wish to mention the importance of fraternal solidarity, which is expressed concretely in service and can take a variety of forms, all directed at supporting our neighbours. "Serving means caring ... for the vulnerable of our families, our society, our people" (Homily in Havana, 20 September 2015). In this outreach, all are "called to set aside their own wishes and desires, their pursuit of power, before the concrete gaze of those who are most vulnerable... Service always looks to their faces, touches their flesh, senses their closeness and even, in some cases, 'suffers' that closeness and tries to help them. Service is never ideological, for we do not serve ideas, we serve people" (ibid.).

    4. If a therapy is to be effective, it must have a relational aspect, for this enables a holistic approach to the patient. Emphasizing this aspect can help doctors, nurses, professionals and volunteers to feel responsible for accompanying patients on a path of healing grounded in a trusting interpersonal relationship (cf. New Charter for Health Care Workers [2016], 4). This creates a covenant between those in need of care and those who provide that care, a covenant based on mutual trust and respect, openness and availability. This will help to overcome defensive attitudes, respect the dignity of the sick, safeguard the professionalism of healthcare workers and foster a good relationship with the families of patients.

    Such a relationship with the sick can find an unfailing source of motivation and strength in the charity of Christ, as shown by the witness of those men and women who down the millennia have grown in holiness through service to the infirm. For the mystery of Christ's death and resurrection is the source of the love capable of giving full meaning to the experience of patients and caregivers alike. The Gospel frequently makes this clear by showing that Jesus heals not by magic but as the result of an encounter, an interpersonal relationship, in which God's gift finds a response in the faith of those who accept it. As Jesus often repeats: "Your faith has saved you".

    5. Dear brothers and sisters, the commandment of love that Jesus left to his disciples is also kept in our relationship with the sick. A society is all the more human to the degree that it cares effectively for its most frail and suffering members, in a spirit of fraternal love. Let us strive to achieve this goal, so that no one will feel alone, excluded or abandoned.

    To Mary, Mother of Mercy and Health of the Infirm, I entrust the sick, healthcare workers and all those who generously assist our suffering brothers and sisters. From the Grotto of Lourdes and her many other shrines throughout the world, may she sustain our faith and hope, and help us care for one another with fraternal love. To each and all, I cordially impart my blessing.

    Rome, Saint John Lateran, 20 December 2020,
    Fourth Sunday of Advent

    Franciscus

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

  • POPE FRANCIS' MESSAGE ON WORLD MISSION SUNDAY 2020

    20th October 2020

    MESSAGE OF HIS HOLINESS POPE FRANCIS
    FOR WORLD MISSION DAY 2020

    Here am I, send me (Is 6:8)

    Dear Brothers and Sisters,

    I wish to express my gratitude to God for the commitment with which the Church throughout the world carried out the Extraordinary Missionary Month last October. I am convinced that it stimulated missionary conversion in many communities on the path indicated by the theme: "Baptized and Sent: the Church of Christ on Mission in the World".

    In this year marked by the suffering and challenges created by the Covid-19 pandemic, the missionary journey of the whole Church continues in light of the words found in the account of the calling of the prophet Isaiah: "Here am I, send me" (6:8). This is the ever new response to the Lord's question: "Whom shall I send?" (ibid.). This invitation from God's merciful heart challenges both the Church and humanity as a whole in the current world crisis. "Like the disciples in the Gospel we were caught off guard by an unexpected, turbulent storm. We have realized that we are on the same boat, all of us fragile and disoriented, but at the same time important and needed, all of us called to row together, each of us in need of comforting the other. On this boat... are all of us. Just like those disciples, who spoke anxiously with one voice, saying 'We are perishing' (v. 38), so we too have realized that we cannot go on thinking of ourselves, but only together can we do this" (Meditation in Saint Peter's Square, 27 March 2020). We are indeed frightened, disoriented and afraid. Pain and death make us experience our human frailty, but at the same time remind us of our deep desire for life and liberation from evil. In this context, the call to mission, the invitation to step out of ourselves for love of God and neighbour presents itself as an opportunity for sharing, service and intercessory prayer. The mission that God entrusts to each one of us leads us from fear and introspection to a renewed realization that we find ourselves precisely when we give ourselves to others.

    In the sacrifice of the cross, where the mission of Jesus is fully accomplished (cf. Jn 19:28-30), God shows us that his love is for each and every one of us (cf. Jn 19:26-27). He asks us to be personally willing to be sent, because he himself is Love, love that is always "on mission", always reaching out in order to give life. Out of his love for us, God the Father sent his Son Jesus (cf. Jn 3:16). Jesus is the Father's Missionary: his life and ministry reveal his total obedience to the Father's will (cf. Jn 4:34; 6:38; 8:12-30; Heb 10:5-10). Jesus, crucified and risen for us, draws us in turn into his mission of love, and with his Spirit which enlivens the Church, he makes us his disciples and sends us on a mission to the world and to its peoples.

    "The mission, the 'Church on the move', is not a programme, an enterprise to be carried out by sheer force of will. It is Christ who makes the Church go out of herself. In the mission of evangelization, you move because the Holy Spirit pushes you, and carries you" (Senza di Lui non possiamo fare nulla: Essere missionari oggi nel mondo. Una conversazione con Gianni Valente, Libreria Editrice Vaticana: San Paolo, 2019, 16-17). God always loves us first and with this love comes to us and calls us. Our personal vocation comes from the fact that we are sons and daughters of God in the Church, his family, brothers and sisters in that love that Jesus has shown us. All, however, have a human dignity founded on the divine invitation to be children of God and to become, in the sacrament of Baptism and in the freedom of faith, what they have always been in the heart of God.

    Life itself, as a gift freely received, is implicitly an invitation to this gift of self: it is a seed which, in the baptized, will blossom as a response of love in marriage or in virginity for the kingdom of God. Human life is born of the love of God, grows in love and tends towards love. No one is excluded from the love of God, and in the holy sacrifice of Jesus his Son on the cross, God conquered sin and death (cf. Rom 8:31-39). For God, evil - even sin - becomes a challenge to respond with even greater love (cf. Mt 5:38-48; Lk 22:33-34). In the Paschal Mystery, divine mercy heals our wounded humanity and is poured out upon the whole universe. The Church, the universal sacrament of God's love for the world, continues the mission of Jesus in history and sends us everywhere so that, through our witness of faith and the proclamation of the Gospel, God may continue to manifest his love and in this way touch and transform hearts, minds, bodies, societies and cultures in every place and time.

    Mission is a free and conscious response to God's call. Yet we discern this call only when we have a personal relationship of love with Jesus present in his Church. Let us ask ourselves: are we prepared to welcome the presence of the Holy Spirit in our lives, to listen to the call to mission, whether in our life as married couples or as consecrated persons or those called to the ordained ministry, and in all the everyday events of life? Are we willing to be sent forth at any time or place to witness to our faith in God the merciful Father, to proclaim the Gospel of salvation in Jesus Christ, to share the divine life of the Holy Spirit by building up the Church? Are we, like Mary, the Mother of Jesus, ready to be completely at the service of God's will (cf. Lk 1:38)? This interior openness is essential if we are to say to God: "Here am I, Lord, send me" (cf. Is 6:8). And this, not in the abstract, but in this chapter of the life of the Church and of history.

    Understanding what God is saying to us at this time of pandemic also represents a challenge for the Church's mission. Illness, suffering, fear and isolation challenge us. The poverty of those who die alone, the abandoned, those who have lost their jobs and income, the homeless and those who lack food challenge us. Being forced to observe social distancing and to stay at home invites us to rediscover that we need social relationships as well as our communal relationship with God. Far from increasing mistrust and indifference, this situation should make us even more attentive to our way of relating to others. And prayer, in which God touches and moves our hearts, should make us ever more open to the need of our brothers and sisters for dignity and freedom, as well as our responsibility to care for all creation. The impossibility of gathering as a Church to celebrate the Eucharist has led us to share the experience of the many Christian communities that cannot celebrate Mass every Sunday. In all of this, God's question: "Whom shall I send?" is addressed once more to us and awaits a generous and convincing response: "Here am I, send me!" (Is 6:8). God continues to look for those whom he can send forth into the world and to the nations to bear witness to his love, his deliverance from sin and death, his liberation from evil (cf. Mt 9:35-38; Lk 10:1-12).

    The celebration of World Mission Day is also an occasion for reaffirming how prayer, reflection and the material help of your offerings are so many opportunities to participate actively in the mission of Jesus in his Church. The charity expressed in the collections that take place during the liturgical celebrations of the third Sunday of October is aimed at supporting the missionary work carried out in my name by the Pontifical Mission Societies, in order to meet the spiritual and material needs of peoples and Churches throughout the world, for the salvation of all.

    May the Most Blessed Virgin Mary, Star of Evangelization and Comforter of the Afflicted, missionary disciple of her Son Jesus, continue to intercede for us and sustain us.

    Rome, Saint John Lateran, 31 May 2020, Solemnity of Pentecost

    Franciscus

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

  • REOPENING OF SAINT LAWRENCE FOR MASSES ON THE 25TH AND 26TH JULY 2020

    11th July 2020

    Dear Esteemed Parishioner,

    Good evening and I hope this email meets you well? I wish to thank you for your love, patience, support, prayers for each other and seeking each other out at these extraordinary times.

    Please, I wish to share the following points with you. Kindly take note especially of the points made clearly below

    • It is important to reaffirm that, at present, the obligation to attend Sunday Mass remains suspended. Thus for this reason, Masses on Sundays will be at 9am, 10:15am and 5:00pm (Children's Liturgy will continue at 11:15am every Sunday). But also Masses at 10:00am on Wednesdays will stand out as a significant day in our parish, though coffee meetings will not hold. Please kindly reach out to me and indicate which mass you wish to attend as in individual or a family. I will respond by allocating a pew and space for you or your family
    • Please be aware that there will be a limit on the number of people who can attend Mass in our churches. This will determined locally in accordance with social distancing requirements. To this effect I have attached a little map of the sitting arrangements in the church. The sitting arrangements allow for 25 individuals, but 5 pews have been designated for families of four or more. So the family pews can accommodate 4 at the least. This makes room for an additional 20 persons, taking the capacity of our church to 45 at each mass.

    We therefore need to reflect carefully on how and when we might be able to attend Mass. We cannot return immediately to our customary practices. This next step is not, in any sense, a moment when we are going 'back to normal.'

    • Kindly think carefully about how and when you wish to return to Mass. As you will notice, I have added a mass to Sunday (9am) and adjusted 10am to 10:15am. Nonetheless, given there is no Sunday obligation, I kindly ask you to consider the possibility of attending Mass on a weekday (Monday, Wednesday or Friday). This will ease the pressure of numbers for Sunday celebrations and allow a gradual return to the Eucharist for more people.
    • Moving forward, there will still be many people who cannot attend Mass in person. We therefore shall continue to live-streaming Sunday and weekday Masses, both for those who remain shielding and vulnerable, and also for those unable to leave home because of advanced age or illness.
    • When we return to Mass there will some differences in how the celebration takes place. For the time being, there will be no congregational singing and Mass will be shorter than usual. None of this detracts from the centrality of our encounter with the Risen Christ in the Eucharist. I kindly ask everyone to respect and follow the guidance/instructions in our church.
    • The Sacrament of Reconciliation resumes on Saturday 18th July at 5:15pm in the church.

    ...... Each Parishioner is to attend mass wearing a face mask. Please this is essential.

    ....... Please once you get to the door, sanitise your hands before going to your designated seat. You will equally receive some wipes sanitizer to clean up where you sit after mass. Please make sure you clean where you have sat or knelt at mass.

    ....... Church toilets, Children's room, and parish room will not be in use.

    ....... During the mass, the Stewards will invite parishioners on each pew to step forward for communion or to receive a blessing, maintaining the social distance rules.

    ........ Once the mass is over, parishioners are advised to sit calmly and allow the stewards to invite you to leave the church in an orderly fashion through the exit door by the tabernacle.

    ....... The offertory will be at the end of mass with a basket at the exit door where you may drop your offering

    ....... Readers will sanitize before and after reading (Provisions will be made for you)

    ....... the Chalice will not be in use for parishioners, thus only one Eucharistic minister will be needed at weekend masses. The Eucharistic minister shall sanitise before and after administering the Eucharist to parishioners.

    • Please if you have questions regarding the reception of any of the sacraments, kindly contact the Fr Benedict Via email or a phone Call.
    • THERE WILL BE A ZOOM MEETING OF PARISHIONERS ON THE 18TH JULY 2020, TO CLARIFY OR RESPOND TO ANY QUESTIONS. PLEASE IF YOU ARE FREE, KINDLY ATTEND. See the link below (IT IS IN THE EMAIL SENT TO YOU)


    Prayer to Mary, Mother of Hope

    Mary, Mother of hope, accompany us on our journey!
    Teach us to proclaim the living God;
    help us to bear witness to Jesus, the one Saviour;
    make us kindly towards our neighbours,
    welcoming to the needy, concerned for justice,
    impassioned builders of a more just world;
    intercede for us as we carry out our work in history,
    certain that the Father's plan will be fulfilled.
    Dawn of a new world,
    show yourself the Mother of hope and watch over us!
    Watch over the Church in Europe:
    may she be transparently open to the Gospel;
    may she be an authentic place of communion;
    may she carry out fully her mission of
    proclaiming, celebrating and serving the Gospel of hope for the peace and joy of all.
    Queen of Peace, Protect the men and women of the third millennium!
    Watch over all Christians: may they advance confidently on the path of unity,
    as a leaven of harmony for the continent.
    Watch over young people: the hope of the future,
    may they respond with generosity to the call of Jesus.
    Watch over the leaders of nations:
    may they be committed to building a common house
    which respects the dignity and rights of every person.
    Mary, give us Jesus!
    Grant that we may follow him and love him!
    He is the hope of the Church, of Europe and of all humanity!
    He lives with us, in our midst, in his Church!
    With you we say: "Come, Lord Jesus" (Rev 22:20).
    May the hope of glory which he has poured into our hearts bear fruits of justice and peace! ( St John Paul II, Ecclesia in Europa, 125)

    MAY GOD BLESS YOU AS YOU PREPARE TO RETURN TO THE PHYSICAL CONGREGATION AT THE HOLY MASS.

    YOUR SERVANT PRIEST,

    FR BENEDICT

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

  • REOPENING OF ST LAWRENCE EDENBRIDGE

    20th June 2020

    BASIC RULES FOR OPENING OUR CHURCH

    The entry and exit doors should be clearly identified In and Out.

    Anyone with cold or flu-like symptoms should be asked not to enter.

    Toilets may not be used.

    These Church openings are only for Individual Prayer and no communal prayers, confessions or any other sacraments are to be arranged.

    The Blessed Sacrament may be exposed on the main Altar. With the Blessed Sacrament exposed before the Church opens and remaining until the Church is closed.

    Doors and Windows are to be opened throughout the period and appropriately held open avoiding need by Parishioners to touch them.

    There should be Hand Gel of no less than 65% Alcohol should be available at the entrance and another Hand Gel available at the exit. Clear signage to request parishioners to sanitise their hands on entry and exit should be on display.

    There is no access to Sacristy for anyone other than the Priest.

    Cordon off those seats not to be used and clearly mark out seats to be used to maintain the 2 M social distancing rule. Maximum capacity is to be maintained at 10 people at any one time.

    People to be encouraged not to overstay to avoid lengthy queues.

    Parishioners are prohibited from bringing their own candles.

    Physical veneration of Statues and shrines is not permitted.

    All Shared printed materials including Mass Books, Hymn Books, Devotional items etc are to be removed from sight.

    Only limited single use material is to be made available and parishioners should be instructed to take it away with them.

    Any printed material left by a parishioner will be removed and safely discarded.

    The Team of Stewards and Cleaners are to be briefed as follows:



    STEWARDS

    Neither Stewards nor Cleaners should be classed as clinically vulnerable, self-isolating or shielding.

    Stewards: One steward is to be present at the Front door and the other Steward at the Exit Door at all times the Church is open.

    At least 2 Stewards should be present at all times.

    Stewards should complete an inspection of the premises before opening, to ensure all facilities and equipment are in place and that the Church is compliant.

    Stewards must be given copy of Guidance about Re-Opening of Churches and abide by those instructions.

    Stewards must maintain all social distancing instructions as for others and insure Parishioners are made aware of the instructions to which they must abide.

    Stewards must not shake hands, hug or otherwise break any of the rules whilst in attendance. Stewards should not eat, drink or touch their face, unless they have immediately washed their hands beforehand.

    Stewards should ensure any cuts or graze on their hands are covered complete with waterproof dressings.

    Parish Priest must hold a record or Rota showing who was on duty at any given time, and also keep in the Parish Office, with the rota, the names and contact details of all stewards.

    One of the Stewards could be the Parish Priest but importantly all stewards must be already known to the Parish Priest and be current volunteers in the parish.



    CLEANERS

    Cleaners must be briefed on "Catch it, kill it, bin it" and effective hand hygiene.

    Cleaners must be given copy of Guidance on Re-Opening of Catholic Churches for Individual Prayer and abide by those instructions.

    Cleaners will wear plastic gloves and aprons when cleaning.

    Disposable cloths or paper towels will be used for cleaning.

    Any items left by parishioners will be placed into separate plastic sacks and be removed to lost property

    All cleaners should practice decontamination when returning home by changing clothing and appropriate bathing or showering before mixing with members of their household.



    Items needed

    Hand Sanitisers X 2

    Face Masks X 2 per group of Stewards

    Gloves for all entering church (if possible) and certainly for all Stewards and Cleaners.

    Aprons for all Cleaners

    Entrance and Exit Signage

    COVID-19 Awareness Poster to be displayed at entrance and exit

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

  • WORLD COMMUNICATIONS DAY MESSAGE OF POPE FRANCIS, 2020.

    23rd May 2020

    MESSAGE-OF-POPE-FRANCIS-FOR-THE-54th-WORLD-COMMUNICATIONS-DAY_20200124.pdf

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

  • NOVENA TO THE HOLY SPIRIT

    22nd May 2020

    novena to the Holy Sprit.pdf 

    Author: Benedict Fadoju

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Saint Lawrence

High Street
Edenbridge
TN8 5AQ

Telephone: 01732 862256
Email: info@stlawrence.org.uk

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